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Poster: user unknown Date: Jul 15, 2009 7:55pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: A 'Side' Question

Arb, this is all I could find...

From Wikipedia(validity may be questionable)
"Black Mountain Side" was inspired by a traditional Irish folk song that appears in Bert Jansch's 1966 album Jack Orion as "Blackwaterside"

"Blackwaterside" is a traditional song, with a well-known version being taken from a 1952 BBC Archive recording of an Irish traveller, Mary Doran.[5] This version was taught to the singer Anne Briggs by A.L. Lloyd.[6]

Early in 1965, Bert Jansch and Anne Briggs were regularly performing together in folk clubs[7] and spent most of the daytime at a friend's flat, collaborating on new songs and the development of complex guitar accompaniments for traditional songs.

Not really an answer to your question, but it seems the use of "side" in song titles is traditional???

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Poster: Arbuthnot Date: Jul 15, 2009 8:05pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: A 'Side' Question

thanks B., perhaps traditional might be a key to the larger answer, if there is one; i do seem to recall it used more commonly in traditional or Blues numbers, if that makes any sense; i tried to find other songs that i had with that use of the word, but couldn't locate any; maybe i'm just looking for a meaning that does not exist?

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Poster: barongsong Date: Jul 15, 2009 10:11pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: A 'Side' Question

Cool question. I'm thinking it could have a double meaning sometimes in that it could be a reference to the mood of a song.
People are often referred to as having a black side or sometimes a blue side to there personalities so maybe it's possible they are trying to give that quality to the title of the song in order to invoke a specific mental state or mood that they hope the listener will invoke while listening to the song. Just a guess but thanks for the interesting question to ponder on this lazy mountain side day.

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Poster: Arbuthnot Date: Jul 16, 2009 3:32pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: A 'Side' Question

thank you for replying and for thinking into it for me, i think you and Earl (above) are pretty spot on; certainly an interesting thing to ponder, even when things ain't so lazy!

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Poster: high flow Date: Jul 16, 2009 7:33pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: An Up"side" out, in"side" down Question

For the record, Barongsong stole my answer!:)

He nailed it, imo.

BTW, Keep on the sunnyside, always on the sunnyside.
Keep on the sunnyside of life.
It will help us ev'ry day, it will brighten all the way
If we'll keep on the sunny side of life.



This post was modified by high flow on 2009-07-17 02:30:52

This post was modified by high flow on 2009-07-17 02:33:29

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Poster: jglynn1.2 Date: Jul 17, 2009 11:01am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: An Up'side' out, in'side' down Question

hahahah

Always Look on the Bright Side of Life (from Monty Python)

words and music by Eric Idle

Some things in life are bad
They can really make you mad
Other things just make you swear and curse.
When you're chewing on life's gristle
Don't grumble, give a whistle
And this'll help things turn out for the best...

And...always look on the bright side of life...
Always look on the light side of life...

If life seems jolly rotten
There's something you've forgotten
And that's to laugh and smile and dance and sing.
When you're feeling in the dumps
Don't be silly chumps
Just purse your lips and whistle - that's the thing.

And...always look on the bright side of life...
Always look on the light side of life...

For life is quite absurd
And death's the final word
You must always face the curtain with a bow.
Forget about your sin - give the audience a grin
Enjoy it - it's your last chance anyhow.

So always look on the bright side of death
Just before you draw your terminal breath

Life's a piece of shit
When you look at it
Life's a laugh and death's a joke, it's true.
You'll see it's all a show
Keep 'em laughing as you go
Just remember that the last laugh is on you.

And always look on the bright side of life...
Always look on the right side of life...
(Come on guys, cheer up!)
Always look on the bright side of life...
Always look on the bright side of life...
(Worse things happen at sea, you know.)
Always look on the bright side of life...
(I mean - what have you got to lose?)
(You know, you come from nothing - you're going back to nothing.
What have you lost? Nothing!)
Always look on the right side of life...

KEY Am

verse:
Am G
Am G
Am G E7
A7 D7

chorus:
G E7 Am D7
G E7 A7 D7

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Poster: Earl B. Powell Date: Jul 16, 2009 6:23am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: A 'Side' Question

Day late and a dollar short, story of Mr. Earl's life. I believe it to be nothing more than a descriptive element such as Good-side or bad-side of the tracks. The mountain side or the river side. As far as the blues goes, I can't find any references in the many blues dictionaries available, but in general there's always two sides to almost anything, and there appears to be a distinct line drawn to separate the two.

I know this isn't a definitive answer, but I've always thought of it as being a a term of consequence like the pitfalls you face when taking the high road or low road.

Might be wrong, but that's my take.

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Poster: Arbuthnot Date: Jul 16, 2009 3:25pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: A 'Side' Question

thanks Earl, between you & barongsong's reply (below), looks like i get a better sense of the use of the word; thank you for not letting me down ;)

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